Results for category "Facebook"

109 Articles

Facebook News Feed Takes On Click Baiting

The Facebook News feed is taking a stand on click baiting today. Click baiting is when a page uses an engaging headline that keeps the user wanting more. Facebook wants users to know what they are clicking, so these types of posts will not be shown as often.

Today Facebook announced that they will punish posts with an image and a link in the description. Instead, you should post the link, let Facebook generate the thumbnail and go from there.

If you continue to post photos with a link, you’ll start to see diminished reach. Facebook is striving to make the user experience better by showing more of what you enjoy. The more you enjoy your experience, the longer you will spend using Facebook and the more ads you will see.

Facebook is taking its cues from a survey and feedback from users. Posts with attractive headlines and poor content will be seen less and less. Currently, these types of posts get increased engagement because of their engaging headlines and the curiosity of users.

Facebook is also measuring the amount of time a user spends on a web page outside of Facebook to determine the quality of the content. The longer you are away, the better Facebook will think the content is. The News Feed will also see if you like or comment on a post after returning from the outside website. Posts that keep users away from Facebook longer and receive a like, comment or share after they return, will be rewarded the most.

Does that mean you should be writing longer articles? Perhaps. Longer articles are also weighted favorably by Google in regards to search engine optimization. Try 250-300 words at a minimum.

If you produce good content, Facebook will reward you. If your post does not receive any likes, shares or comments, Facebook will deem it as poor content.

Pro Tip: At the bottom of your article include “If you are reading this article from Facebook, tell me you enjoyed it with a like, share or comment.

What do you think about this change to the News Feed. Let me know on Facebook. :)

 

Facebook to Allow Anonymous Login

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Every year, Facebook holds their F8 conference for developers. This is where they announce what’s to come with the social network. This conference is mostly intended for Facebook developers, but some of their announcements are applicable to the general public. This year, their main focus is mobile and putting people first.

Control How You Share Your Information

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How many times have you logged, or tried to login, to an app only to be forced to provide your login information? Last year Facebook separated read and publish permissions to allow control over what an app could share on your behalf. Apps could no longer require you to give them the right to publish to all your friends prior to signing in to the app.

So now, whenever you login with Facebook, you will see this dialogue. You’ll be able to share, line by line, what you want to share. Sorry, no word on when this will be available just yet.

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Soon, app developers will be able to make people feel more comfortable (sit back relax, and sign into our app) to sign into apps. Apps used to be able to share friends’ data too. Not anymore! Each individual user will have to give permission to what data they share. You will have more power and control over what information is shared.

Anonymous Login

Anonymous Login

In addition to controlling what information you share, Facebook announced the anonymous login. If you don’t want the app to know who you are yet, you still want a streamlined experience of what the app can over. This gives you a hassle free way to experience an app. You’ll have the option of providing login information once you feel more comfortable with the app.

The goal with these two new login tools is to get people more comfortable using apps. The more comfortable you are, the more often you use it. The more often you use it, the more ads Facebook can show you and the more money they can make. People first yes, but money is a close second.

Watch the Whole 2014 F8 Keynote

 

Guest Post: 6 Tips to Make Your Facebook Page as Efficient as Ever

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Facebook has changed. Many think not for the better. But Facebook obviously thinks differently. And we all better get used to it.

Welcome to spring 2014, where we can now write the eulogy of Facebook’s “free lunch” era. What do I mean by that? Well, we’ve all heard the saying “there’s no such thing as a free lunch.” Yet for Facebook’s existence up until now, “free lunch” actually was aplenty for all.

That’s because organic page reach was high. There was a relatively low barrier to entry. Overnight, any Facebook page could become the next big hit. Any page probably had some pretty good engagement numbers on any average post.

But that is no longer the case. You’ve by now likely seen the articles about Facebook’s strategic changes and how that is affecting organic page reach. Here are just a few links from around the web:

Why Facebook is Laughing All the Way to the Bank
Your Brand Posts Are Fading On Facebook
The Free-Marketing Gravy Train Is Over on Facebook
Facebook Is Ending the Free Ride

From October 2013 to February 2014, Facebook organic page reach dropped from 12% to 6%. It will continue to drop and dramatically so. Over time, this number will get closer and closer to zero. That’s reality. It’s Facebook’s prerogative to monetize its product. This was undoubtedly inevitable.

We can’t be sad about it. Instead, we – as managers of small-scale Facebook pages – must be proactive. There are action steps we all can take to make our pages more efficient and encourage as much engagement as possible, at low costs. Just like the olden days.

Here are my top six tips on how to make your Facebook page as efficient as ever, given the changing dynamics of organic page reach:

1. Engage with your posts with your personal account. This is an absolute no-brainer. Facebook’s computing algorithm views favorably posts that already have engagement. This is how certain items go viral. By just regularly sharing, liking and commenting on your own page’s posts with your own account, you’re getting an easy bonus point (or two or three). Do this often.

2. Ask other people to also engage with your page’s posts. Same reasons apply! You should plant occasional seeds with friends, colleagues, board members and more to have them also engage with their shares, likes and comments. These are such easy, easy tasks. You should never have an important Facebook post end up with little-to-zero engagement. That’s your own fault for not engaging yourself and directly asking others to do so as well.

3. Use photos as often as possible. Photos are vitally important on all social media entities in 2014. Facebook made changes not too long ago that hurt “text-only” posts, an under-appreciated wild card of the olden days. Nowadays, never do that. Every post should have a graphic of some kind. Don’t have one that relates? Use an organizational one! Anything counts.

4. Scratch that: Use good photos as often as possible. Well, more specifically, you should strive to only use good photos. What do I mean by that? Use high-resolution photos with real-life smiling people. These individuals should be as excited as you are to share the word about your organization. Check with them first to make sure they like the photo. Make sure the lighting is good, the background is not too boring and as always, have fun!

5. No ugly links. I see this way, way, way too often. That’s unacceptable in 2014. This item should definitely have been on my social media pet peeves list. I’m not sure how it didn’t make the cut. On Facebook nowadays, links load up with thumbnails and website previews. That means you can then delete the text of the link. Always do that. If the link still looks funny or ugly, use a link shortener, such as bit.ly. That should be a regular option too when using photos (!).

6. Keep it simple. Don’t try to do too much at once. As I urged in my last Socially Gold guest post: The No. 1 rule is to be consistent. If the contents of a potential post seem too crowded, split it into multiple posts. When you just have 10-15 minutes of down time, schedule a few posts for the week. Make it easy on yourself. Be direct, clear and concise with any possible calls to action.

As with all social media entities, a Facebook page can’t simply portray a boring and robotic view of your organization. Best practices would encourage page managers to be witty, show personality and display creativity. There are ways to do that, while also not limiting your audience or being too overly political.

There always is a fine balance to play as the manager of an organization’s external image on Facebook. One can never understate the importance of risk management and this especially relates to social media in 2014. Any post can still go viral; and that’s not necessarily a good thing if you’re not careful.

Now that Facebook has been so heavily saturated with more users and more pages, page managers should temper their expectations. Just by creating a Facebook page and posting some bland status, you won’t immediately be inundated with new sales, new customers or any added visibility.

Facebook ads – the ultimate antidote to declining organic page reach – might not be realistic for your organization. You might not have a large enough advertising budget (or one at all). These ads also might not be that good of a value for you. Every situation is different.

But for now, you should at least start by controlling what you can to make your Facebook page’s presence as efficient as possible. That’s all you can directly affect. And there still are plenty of ways to do what you can to grow your page. The tips above are a great place to start.

Jacob Rosen is the Development Associate for Hillel at Kent State University. He can be found on Twitter in two locations: @WFNYJacob, where he tweets about Cleveland sports and sports analytics; and @udjrosen, where he tweets about Northeast Ohio, the media industry and other whimsical things.

Jacob is a contributor at WaitingForNextYear.com and SportsAnalyticsBlog.com. He has professional media relations experience in Minor League Baseball. He also was the editor-in-chief of his college’s newspaper and has been an active social media user (and critic) for years and years.

Facebook Adjusts News Feed Algorithm

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I have sad news to report. Facebook is playing with their news feed algorithm yet again and it is going to affect your brand page. I thought this was just a rumor, but when Time and AdAge report on it, it has to be true. Facebook has already cut down organic (non-paid) reach from 12% to 6% and it will soon be cut down to 1-2%. Users are likely to like a page and never see their content (organically) in their news feed ever again.

A Facebook engineer explained the competitive environment last summer when he cited internal research showing that 1,500 pieces of content are eligible to appear every time a daily user logs into the network. Each day, an average of 300 “stories” are then prioritized by news feed algorithms to appear to that user.

What’s do I do?

The annoying answer is to open your wallet. If you want to have more of your fans see your posts, you’re going to have to shell out the cash. The really of it all stinks if you ask me. Facebook made over $7 billion in ad revenue last year and are looking to make more. They are a public company now and they have investors to make happy. If you are unfamiliar with facebook ads, you can pay facebook to display your content to your fans or non-fans. The more money you are willing to pay, the more people you can reach.

How else can I get my message out there?

You may want to consider other social networks and communication channels to get your message out there.

  • Instagram
  • LinkedIn
  • Vine
  • Snapchat
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Word of mouth

I’m upset that Facebook is not what it used to be. The non-profit clients I work with aren’t able to shell out extra cash to tell their story, so they will have to go elsewhere.

What do you think?

Is this enough to make you rethink your use of Facebook? Share what you are thinking in the comments.

Zuckerberg Bashes the Government

Yesterday Mark Zuckerberg took to his personal profile to express his frustration with what the government and NSA are doing. He even put a call into the President to express his frustration.

I don’t think that we’ll ever escape what Edward Snowden exposed about the NSA.I’m curious what your thoughts are about Zuckerberg expressing his feelings on his Facebook page.

I’m all for it! It helps young people stay on top of what the government is up to. Way to go Mark!

 

 

 

Facebook Updates News Feed Algorithm for Pages

Facebook changes news feed algorithm for pages

Facebook announced today (2/25/14) that they are changing their news feed algorithm for pages. What used to be known as Edge Rank had marketers very upset. The statistic was that only 16% of page fans would see a post. This announcement will hopefully turn those marketing frowns around.

[Tweet "This announcement will hopefully turn those marketing frowns around. "]

What is the Announcement?

Facebook explains it as “a new way for people to discover conversations around topics they’ve expressed interest in.” When a page tags another page, fans of the tagged page are likely to see the post, even if they are not a fan of the page. In the example post above, fans of James Harden and Dwight Howard may see the post from Bleacher Report, even though they do not like Bleacher Report.

This will function the same way as when a friend tags me in a photo. My friends may see the photo even if they aren’t friends with the person who tagged me.

What does this mean?

Now, if you tag Coca-Cola in your post, fans of the beverage company are likely to see your post, even if they don’t already like your page. There are a few things to keep in mind…

  • This will only work for pages, not personal accounts
  • Facebook will take relevant content into account. Don’t tag Coca-Cola if you aren’t talking about soda pop
  • It’s not suggested to tag Coca-Cola in every post in hopes of expanding your reach

What we don’t know…

  • How well will this new algorithm will work?
  • Will Facebook Insights tell you how many fans of the other page saw your post?
  • Will this only work well for larger brands?

How others are reacting…

 

What do you think?

The jury is still out as to whether or not this will help brands and/or hurt the user experience with spammy posts. Share your thoughts in the comments below.

How to Create a Facebook Ad For Your Website

In this article, I’ll show you how to create a Facebook ad that points to your website. I’ll also answer some questions you may have about Facebook ads along the way such as…

. How much should I bid per click for my Facebook ad?
. Should I bid for clicks or impressions on Facebook?
. How do I create a targeted audience on Facebook?
. How do I measure the success of my Facebook ad?

Why should I purchase Facebook ads?

Facebook doesn’t show every fan of your page every post that you compose. It is necessary to advertise on Facebook to get in front of more people. You can also target specific audiences, even users who have not liked your Facebook Page.

Let’s get started…

Step 1. 

Login to your account and while viewing your newsfeed, click Ads Manager (or Create ad if this is your first one) on the left navigation bar.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 2. 

After clicking ads manager, click on “Create an Ad” at the top right.

How to create a facebook ad
Step 3. 

Determine what type of ad you would like to run. This tutorial will cover how to create an ad that points to a website.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 4. 

Click on “Clicks to Website” and type in the website you would like your ad to point to.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 5. 

After you type in the website for your Facebook ad and hit continue, the next screen will automatically load. Now you’ll want to upload a(n) image(s) for your Facebook ad. The ideal size for a Facebook ad image is 600×315. If you need help creating images for your Facebook ad contact me to inquire about graphic design services.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 6. 

Choose a Facebook Page to be associated with your ad from the drop down menu. If you want to create a News Feed ad. You can also hit the “+” button to create a new Facebook Page if necessary. If you only want to run right sidebar ads, you don’t need to associate it with a Facebook Page. Hit “Turn off News Feed Ads” to bypass this setting.

The ads manager will auto-generate text from the website you selected. If you are unhappy with what was generated, you’ll need to change it.

If you would like text to appear underneath the link, click “Show Advanced Options”.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 7. Select your audience 

Facebook gives you the opportunity to create a highly customized audience. If you have a data file or a MailChimp account, you can create a highly targeted custom audience. If you would like me to cover these custom methods in detail, let me know in the comments.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 8. 

Instead of creating a highly customized audience, you can use the built in Facebook method of defining your audience.

How to create a facebook ad

You can target your ads further by adding demographics.

How to create a facebook ad

Let’s use Cornell as a target audience and individuals between the ages of 18-26 in college.  I also want to target those who have social media listed in their profile as an interest. If you pick multiple interests, your targeted user only has to be interested in one of those items to be served your ad. Above the age selector, you can target by location. This ad is targeted to those who live in Ithaca, NY.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 9. 

You can also target fans of your Facebook Page, their friends or exclude them them as well. In this step, you can only target/exclude pages you manage.

How to create a facebook ad

Step 10. Setting a budget

You can either set a daily budget, or a lifetime budget. If you set a daily budget, once your daily budget is reached for that day, your ad will stop running, and will start again the next day.  You can also set a lifetime budget and your ad will continuously run until your budget runs out or your duration has come to an end. Setting a daily budget will prolong the life of your ad over a lifetime budget.

How to create a facebook ad

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Step 11. How to bid – Clicks or Impressions

Clicks – I like to bid for clicks, which means I only pay Facebook for my ad when someone clicks on it.

Impressions – You can also bid for impressions, which you pay per 1000 views of your ad, also known as CPM (cost per 1,000). I don’t prefer to bid this way as 1,000 people could “see” my add, but never click on it.

How to create a facebook ad How to create a facebook ad Step 12. 

You’re done. Hit Place Order and pat yourself on the back for getting through this whole tutorial.

Tweet This!

“I just read how to create facebook ads to by website via @socially_Gold” —

Create tweets just like this on your website with Click to Tweet

Step 13. Measuring the success of your Facebook Ad. 

Once you place your order, it will need to be approved. Sometimes it can take up to 24 hours, but I have found that it happens sooner and you’ll get a notification alerting you once your ad approved. Once your ad starts running you can check your progress by going back into the Ads Manager and clicking on your ad.

This ad is targeted differently from the ad I created above, but you can see my progress. If you targeting an ad to your own website, you can create a conversion pixel (HTML code), which will tell you how many people clicked your ad and ended up on your  website. This is helpful to know how many people landed on your site on their own vs. because of your ad. If you would like me to cover more about conversion pixels, let me know in the comments.

If you are targeting someone else’s website, a website where you can’t add extra HTML, you may want to determine another way to measure whether or not your ad is successful. You can’t determine an ads success just by the number of clicks and impressions. Your advertising on Facebook because you want your audience to do something. You need to figure out how many people did what you wanted them to do to see if running the ad was worth while.

If you have any questions about how to create a Facebook ad or items I didn’t cover, leave them in the comments.

how to create a facebook ad

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More Ways to Recruit for Taglit-Birthright Using Social Media

taglit-birthight social media

Last year I wrote an article about how to effectively use social media to recruit for Taglit-Birthright, the free 10-day trip to Israel for Jews between 18-26. Today, I hosted a 1-hour training for the University of Texas Hillel and came up with even more ways.

 

 

Flappy Bird Parody Ad

Flappy Bird, the addicting iPhone game that has the internet buzzing and users frustrated makes for a perfect parody video. As of Sunday, February 9, 2014, you can no longer download it from the app store.

Here is the idea…

The first shot is of a few students who look like they are frustrated and playing Flappy Bird. The next shot, someone walks in and asks if they are playing the addicting game, and comments on how difficult it is. Little does the audience know, but they aren’t playing Flappy Bird, they are trying to sign-up for the trip before registration opens, which has them Flappy Bird frustrated. This is a good way to promote when registration opens. It also can be a 30 second video, which is easy to consume.

High social capital

I always encourage Hillels that I work with to find students who have high social capital. What do I mean? A student with high social capital is in numerous groups on campus. Perhaps they are in student government and in a fraternity/sorority. Students with high social capital will help your message spread faster.

Hashtag Photo Contest

Create a unique hashtag and have your students share photos from their trip to Israel using that hashtag. Publishing a photo and using the hashtag can enter them into a contest to win X. The contest provides an incentive for students to participate, but it also gives you metrics to measure your participation year over year. Make an effort to increase the number of hashtag uses on an ongoing basis. Also, don’t forget to encourage contest participants to post the link to register with their post.

Israel Photo booth and fill in the blank

Incentives will be key to your success with this one. Set up a photo booth with a giant cutout of an old Polaroid photo (Example in the slideshare above). When someone stops by your booth, ask to take the picture using their phone, so they can immediately share it. Encourage them to tag you as well. You’ll see huge growth in your page by doing this.

At the bottom of the photo, put the phrase “I love _________ about Israel.” When they share the photo, they can add what they love about Israel. Their friends will start to chime in too.

Post a countdown

“Registration starts in x days”. Get your fans hyped with engaging photos and a countdown to the day that they can register for the trip. Keep a wait list so students can provide their emails prior to registration opening.

Grass Roots Ideas

Encourage Responses via email and text

Post a question on your page with a multiple choice options. I love ________ about Israel. A. Humus B. Camels C. Tel-Aviv and D. Other (user-generated favorite). Have a few students start the answering and have them text or email their friends to respond to the question as well. There is no reason that you have to rely on organic responses, feel free to force it a little. You can also enter commenters into a contest if you want to encourage more responses.

Cover and Profile Photos

Ask users to change their Facebook profile and cover photos to promote registration. The ideal size for profile images is 180×180 and cover photos are 751×315.

These are just a few ideas to recruit for Taglit-Birthright using social media. If you enjoyed this article please share it.

 

Social Media Quick Tip: Ask and You Shall Receive

Social Media Quick Tip

There is a game that I like to play when I host an online social media training and it involves asking for likes. I encourage attendees to mention that they are at a social media training and they are looking for x amount of likes on their status. Not everyone does it, but the ones that do always find success. Emily from Texas A&M decided to ask for 100 likes. I was a little nervous that she wasn’t going to reach her goal because it was a larger number. People in the past have asked for 20 or 30.

As you can see above, I am happy to announce that Emily reached her goal by the next day and then some. The number is always exceeded too. I haven’t seen someone get the exact amount of likes that they asked for. Their friends must be over zealous.

What is the social media quick tip? 

Ask and you shall receive. Social media page admins don’t always realize this, but all you have to do is ask. Your social media channels are not just billboards to relay information, they should be used to foster and create conversation.

A note about privacy

Computers and mobile devices make it easy to take screen shots, and even if you delete a post, the screenshot will last forever. Note that I asked Emily if it was okay if I shared her post on my blog.

You never know who is taking screen shots of your “private” Facebook posts. You can learn more about Facebook security settings and friends lists in prior posts. Asking Emily if I can share her post also gets her excited about her being featured on the blog and hopefully it encourages her to share it. Thanks in advance Emily!

1000 High School Students Sing the National Anthem in Viral Video

Michelle Johnson was staying at a hotel in KY and saw this happen. She initially thought it was for the opening of the Olympics, but posted an update the next day saying it wasn’t. At the time of this post, Michelle’s video has 398,095 shares.